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Décembre 2019

 

Lundi
13/12 / 2019

 
 

 

 

Contact : yann.leverrier@inserm.fr mathias.faure@inserm.fr

Lundi
04 / 11 / 2019

11h00
Salle Condorcet

Séminaire Externe

« Toward understanding how biological clocks drive sleep »
Steven BROWN (University of Zurich)
Host: Kiran Padmanabhan                                                                                                                                                                                                                  . 
                                                                                                                                                                                             

 

Lundi
02/12 / 2019

11h00
Salle Condorcet

Séminaire Externe

 

« The complex evolutionary history of brown algal sex Chromosomes »

   Susana COELHO                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            . (Station Biologique deRoscoff,CNRS)                host: Nicolas Goudemand

Mardi
02/12 / 2019

11h00
IBCP Conférence
" Chill life's machinery under the microscope: visualization of viruses and enzymes by cryoEM "
Javier Cifuente
(Structural Glycobiology Group, CIC bioGUNE, Bizkaia Spain; invited by N Aghajari)                                                                                                                                                                                      
 

 

Lundi
04.05/12 / 2019

11h00
Amphi Mérieux

Séminaire externe

 

Immunotherapies & Innovations for Infectious Diseases Congress 2019
                          https://i4id.org/ We are proud to welcome you to the third edition of the Immunotherapies & Innovations for Infectious Diseases Congress (I4ID2019), that will be held in Lyon, France on December 4-5, 2019.
The purpose of this two-day congress is to foster interactions between pharmaceutical industries, research labs, service providers, technology developers, and clinicians, thus contribute to the development of innovative strategies against infectious diseases in a multidisciplinary approach.
I4ID2019, follows the success of the first two editions, I4ID2017 & I4ID2018, that counted with the presence of more than 330 participants from different countries representing more than 160+ organizations and 60 internationally renowned speakers that have exchanged on immunotherapy as a new therapeutic approach to fight infectious diseases.
For this year edition I4ID2019, the congress will address immunotherapies for infectious diseases as well as highlight complementary innovative approaches. The Scientific Committee has set-up a stimulating program focusing on therapeutic strategies, diagnosis and epidemiology to fight infectious diseases and tackle the issue of antimicrobial multi-resistance. The program will in particular propose talks on immunotherapy, phagotherapy, microbiota, new antimicrobials, diagnosis tools, biomarkers, epidemiology, NGS strategies, real-time follow up and the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in these fields.
The I4ID2019 includes keynote lectures, pitch talks of new innovative projects, industrial talks from pharmaceutical companies and poster presentations.
Moreover, there will be several opportunities for networking, companies to showcase their new products and technologies as well as dedicated time for business partnering, through an online B2B platform.                                                                                                                                                                           .                    

Mardi
04/12 / 2019

11h00
Salle des Thèses CRC
Séminaire externe
“ 6ème journée nationale de recherche en rhumatologie pédiatrique ”

 

contact : Alexandre Belot
                                                                                                                                                        

Lundç
09 /12 / 2019

11h00
Salle Condorcet
« TBC »                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  

Anne KNOWLTON         

        

(Editor of Current Biology)              host: Jan TRAAS

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               

Mardi
10 / 12 / 2019

11h00
Salle des Thèses CRC
Séminaire externe
 Regulation of T-cell immunity and tolerance to cancer by the NF-kB family of transcription factors ”

Dr Yenkel GRINBERG-BLEYER

(CRCL) contact : henri.gruffat@inserm.fr                                                                          

Cancer progression is greatly influenced by a delicate balance between immunity and tolerance to tumors. While effector T cells (Teff) function to destroy tumor cells, their regulatory T cell (Treg) counterparts are powerful inhibitors of anti-tumor activity. The recent success of immunotherapies demonstrates that this balance can be shifted effectively towards enhanced anti-tumor immunity, to delay or even stop cancer progression. However, only a fraction of patients respond to these treatments. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that drive these responses therefore has important implications for the development of improved therapies. We have recently highlighted the selective contributions of NF-kappaB subunits in Treg function during cancer. Genetic and chemical inhibition of NF-kB c-Rel, but not RelA, impaired Treg homeostasis and delayed cancer growth in mouse models, highlighting c-Rel as a promising therapeutic target. Intriguingly, we recently observed that RelA is essential in the function of mouse and human Teff cells in the steady-state and during cancer. Our work provides novel insights in the molecular regulation of immunity and tolerance to cancer, and paves the way to NF-kB subunits-specific targeting therapies.

Mercredi
18 / 12 / 2019

11h00
Amphi Pasteur
« Partitioning the genome via chromatin looping and phase separation »

 Giorgio Trinchieri                      

(Director of the Cancer and Inflammation Program (CIP)
Center for Cancer Research, NCI, NIH Bethesda, Maryland - USA) contact : uzma.hasan@inserm.fr

 

Commensal microorganisms colonize barrier surfaces of all multicellular organisms, including those of humans. For more than 500 million years commensal microorganisms and their hosts have coevolved and adapted to each other. As a result, the commensal microbiota affects many immune and non-immune functions of their hosts, and de facto the two together comprise one metaorganism. The commensal microbiota communicates with the host via biologically active molecules. Recently, it has been reported that microbial imbalance may play a critical role in the development of multiple diseases, such as cancer, autoimmune conditions and increased susceptibility to infection. The commensal microbiota not only may affect the development, progression and immune evasion of cancer but it has also important effects on the response to cancer immune- and chemo-therapy. Myeloid cells are a major component of the tumor microenvironment where they play a dual role inducing anti-tumor immune responses but mostly promoting immune evasion, tumor progression and metastases formation. Myeloid cells respond to environmental factors including signals derived from
commensal microbes that modulate their function and reactivity thus impacting the response to cancer therapy. The mechanism by which the microbiota controls the response to cancer therapy is due in part to priming of the myeloid cells in the tumor microenvironment to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species. Recently several reports have suggested that also in cancer patients treated with immunocheckpoint inhibitors the composition of the microbiota may affect the success of the therapy. In my seminar I will present a critical valuation of published and unpublished clinical data and discuss targeting of the microbiome composition to improve patients’ response to anti-PD1 therapy using diet modification and fecal microbiota transplantation.

   
   
   
   
   
   
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